A Travellerspoint blog

Mid-size towns pack a king-size punch

Ferrara, Gubbio, Modena, Padova, Parma, Ravenna, Vicenza

semi-overcast 16 °C

One of the reasons for choosing to base ourselves in Bologna was its status as a key transport hub in Northern Italy. Milan, Venice, and Florence are all less than 90 minutes away, but what we had severely underestimated was the allure and charm of the smaller towns that we have been exploring over the last few months. Our favourites are listed below :

FERRARA (Emilia-Romagna) pop 134,000

Famous for the almost completely intact city walls (13th century), and Castello Estense, both built courtesy of the d'Este family who ruled for 300 years. Ferrara is a terrific town to cycle around, and sample the local delicacy of cappellaci di zucca - a hat-shaped pasta pouch filled with pumpkin and herbs, and basted with sage & butter.

to paraphrase Lance; in Ferrara, it's all about the bike

to paraphrase Lance; in Ferrara, it's all about the bike

two hands for beginners ... Nonna handling her machine with aplomb

two hands for beginners ... Nonna handling her machine with aplomb

Castello Estense - the moat was extra wide to ward off heavily taxed citizens!

Castello Estense - the moat was extra wide to ward off heavily taxed citizens!

GUBBIO (Umbria) pop 33,000

A bit off the tourist beaten path in Umbria, we enjoyed a delightful two days in this attractive town perched on the slopes of Monte Ingino. We were fortunate enough to run into the annual tartufo (truffle) festival whilst visiting, staged right beside the impressive Palazzo dei Consoli. The undoubted highlight however was a return ride on the very quaint Funivia Colle Eletto - a caged contraption that shuttles you up and down the monte.

murky weather can't conceal the beauty of this Umbrian gem

murky weather can't conceal the beauty of this Umbrian gem

Nat on the Funivia ... fearless as always!

Nat on the Funivia ... fearless as always!

MODENA (Emilia-Romagna) pop 179,000

Birthplace of Pavarotti; home of 'aceto balsamico di Modena' (world's best vinegar to you and I); Ferrari motor cars manufactured just up the road in Maranello; maker of Lambrusco (lightly sparkling red wine) - there is plenty to like about this under-the-radar town thirty minutes from Bologna. Throw in a significant cathedral, attractive piazzas, and "some of the best restaurants no one's ever heard of" as Lonely Planet cleverly put it, and a trip is mandatory for those living in the area.

Piazza Mazzini - an attractive green space so often lacking in Italian towns

Piazza Mazzini - an attractive green space so often lacking in Italian towns

Torre Ghirlandina stands at an impressive 87 metres

Torre Ghirlandina stands at an impressive 87 metres

not-so-long and winding roads always worth a look in Modena

not-so-long and winding roads always worth a look in Modena

PADOVA (Veneto) pop 213,000

A lively university town (uni was established 1222) - it can be just as fun sitting down for an aperitivo with the studenti as it is viewing the sites. You will be richly rewarded however by a visit to the stunning Giotto frescoes in the Scrovegni Chapel, and a wander through the world's oldest botanic gardens still in their original location - Orto Botanico. Another favourite of ours is the unusually designed Gothic Palazzo della Ragione from the 13th century, which divides the attractive Piazza delle Erbe and Piazza della Frutta ... no prizes for guessing what was sold here over the centuries!

insalata days in Piazza delle Erbe

insalata days in Piazza delle Erbe

Gabi braves the elements to showcase the eye-catching Palazzo della Ragione

Gabi braves the elements to showcase the eye-catching Palazzo della Ragione

Orto Botanico ... Lisa at her photographic best above and below

Orto Botanico ... Lisa at her photographic best above and below

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PARMA (Emilia Romagna) pop 177,000

A prosperous and attractive town, you need at least a couple of days to fully appreciate all that the home of the famous parmesan cheese and parma ham has to offer. When you have had your fill of the delicious local cuisine - Trattoria Corrieri served us well - there are myriad significant buildings to visit, and a beautiful park (Parco Ducale) to walk off the excesses of a lengthy lunch. Of the buildings, the gorgeous Battistero, and the substantial Palazzo della Pilotta (which houses Teatro Farnese and the Galleria Nazionale) captivated us the most.

kids hamming it up at the famous Salumeria Garibaldi

kids hamming it up at the famous Salumeria Garibaldi

ceiling of the stunning octagonal shaped Battistero ... construction started in 1196 but took another 110 years due to pink marble shortages

ceiling of the stunning octagonal shaped Battistero ... construction started in 1196 but took another 110 years due to pink marble shortages

Parco Ducale ... these nifty machines were called mosquitoes, and could certainly zip along

Parco Ducale ... these nifty machines were called mosquitoes, and could certainly zip along

Castello di Torrechiara - 20 minutes out of Parma and well worth a visit

Castello di Torrechiara - 20 minutes out of Parma and well worth a visit

RAVENNA (Emilia Romagna) pop 153,000

Deservedly famous for its' Byzantine mosaics, Ravenna also serves as a stopping off point to the Adriatic in summer. It is a very peaceful town to visit, and presents the Unesco listed treasures without too much fuss.

Basilica di San Vitale - looking up - very hard to capture the brilliance on film

Basilica di San Vitale - looking up - very hard to capture the brilliance on film

Basilica di San Vitale - floor mosaics - pretty divine

Basilica di San Vitale - floor mosaics - pretty divine

another bit of traveller's good fortune; running into the bread festival of all things!

another bit of traveller's good fortune; running into the bread festival of all things!

too many churches Dad ...

too many churches Dad ...

VICENZA (Veneto) pop 115,000

The adopted home of Andrea Palladio, one of the most influential figures in Western architecture. Vicenza showcases many of his amazing buildings, now Unesco listed ... Lonely Planet describes his style as a marriage of "sophistication and rustic simplicity, reverent classicism and bold innovation". Lisa and Rosemary were especially taken by Teatro Olimpico, built in the late 1500's, and the oldest and first enclosed theatre in the world. It also showcases the 'trompe l'oeil' (deceive the eye) onstage scenery, which gives the appearance of long streets receding to a distant horizon.

Piazza dei Signori ... Palladio's genius on display

Piazza dei Signori ... Palladio's genius on display

Teatro Olimpico - Rosemary's looks misleading as she gave this masterpiece top marks

Teatro Olimpico - Rosemary's looks misleading as she gave this masterpiece top marks

Teatro Olimpico - the beautiful deception ...

Teatro Olimpico - the beautiful deception ...

beauty of the town not restricted to man-made structures

beauty of the town not restricted to man-made structures

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Posted by happellfamily12 13:18 Archived in Italy Tagged towns Comments (1)

Bologna Update - Ottobre

teachers, trattorias, tripadvisor, treats, and tifosi

overcast 16 °C

TEACHERS

After much discussion, legwork, and more than a little angst, we opted to enrol Gabi in Bologna's International School (ISB). Original intentions were to 'throw her in the deep end' at a local school, but a number of considerations prevented that from occurring.

Day 1 across from the school ... what nerves Dad?

Day 1 across from the school ... what nerves Dad?

Without going into laborious detail, our main concern was how she would enjoy herself, and advance educationally, in a foreign speaking environment. Plenty of qualified people we spoke to said she would be fine and pick up Italiano quickly, but we couldn't convince ourselves that would be the case. So she started at the ISB on the 16th October (around 5 weeks later than most her class), and so far everything has worked out well.

Day 1 dropoff with Jayne Dowd ... Mum looks a bit uptight

Day 1 dropoff with Jayne Dowd ... Mum looks a bit uptight

Day 1 ... stop fussing parents!

Day 1 ... stop fussing parents!

The school runs from kindergarten up to year 6, and is quite small with only one class per year and about 18 in each class. Italian food is served up every day for lunch - no complaints there from Gabs! - and the school day is a standard 8:50 to 3:30. In her class most of the kids are Italian (or close enough with at least one Italian parent), and hence they study Italian as a 'mother tongue', whilst Gabi, plus a Swedish girl and a American boy study Italian twice a week as a second language. As is the case across all of Italy, extra curricular activities are organised by the parents and take place away from the school, so no school sports teams which is a shame.

TRATTORIAS

With Gabi in school, and Nat in child care/preschool, the hard working genitori (parents) now have some extra time up their sleeves (please suppress laughter, and we know the sympathy won't be forthcoming!). Lisa is still beavering away at language school, and I'm becoming more closely acquainted with our local trattorias and osterias.

I thought it might be interesting to look at the cost of a solo lunch the other day. The place in question was Trattoria Fantoni - in many respects a normal restaurant in a low-key part of town. It does have a good reputation however, and the locals tend to flock there during the week (lunchtime here is from 1:00, and can go as late as 3:00). A delicious bowl of pasta was AUD 6.25; mixed salad (enough for 2) $3.75; 250ml carafe of very drinkable house red $4.40; to die for panna cotta with vanilla and caramel $3.75; and an espresso to finish up $1.25. Coperto of $1.85 is the standard service fee charged, which pretty much precludes giving a tip.

adds a new dimension to the term "value for money"

adds a new dimension to the term "value for money"

Apart from the fact that Lisa may seek a divorce as I turn into a blimp, and the favourable exchange rate makes this story a little flimsy, it is still a great way to spend an hour of your time and $20 of your hard earned listening to the locals and eating some great, simple food. And of course this is not an isolated example ... you can find a Trattoria Fantoni down many sidestreets and alleys in Bologna, and also the rest of wonderful Italy.

like so many Italian restaurants, nothing to look at from the outside ... it's what comes out of the kitchen that counts.

like so many Italian restaurants, nothing to look at from the outside ... it's what comes out of the kitchen that counts.

So how do they do it? Well, for this place (& most) customer turnover is the key. In that 2 hour period they will probably get 3 groups through each table, which makes it hard work for them, but keeps the till ringing. Produce is incredibly cheap, and most of these places will only cook what they can buy fresh, so that combined with the very low cost of pasta and wine all helps to make it an affordable experience. Finally, labour costs are also quite low as I understand, at least in the catering industry. So if we can just keep the AUD strong against the euro ...

TRIPADVISOR

I suspect most people who have travelled internationally in the last few years have used this behemoth. It is what Lonely Planet was to backpackers in the 80's and 90's ... a bible to be followed (almost religiously) by pimply travellers without much clue, and a godsend (or death knell) for businesses lucky enough to be listed, or not.

The tripadvisor model is beautiful in its simplicity ... get all the punters to do the work! The website simply collates reviews posted by travellers for accommodation, restaurants, and tourist sites. Places reviewed are given a score out of 5, and this then forms a table where the 'best' place - let's say a restaurant - comes up at the top of a list when a user of the site requests for example 'Bologna Restaurants'. It can be an incredible boon for the business that earns a very high rating, because many people (I'll include myself here) struggle to work their way past the Top 10 for most categories or areas.

Mantova - Osteria delle Erbe - tripadvisor 134 of 182 - this time they got it right ... just a meal

Mantova - Osteria delle Erbe - tripadvisor 134 of 182 - this time they got it right ... just a meal

And herein lies the rub for a city like Bologna. At last count 662 restaurants had been listed with nearly 20,000 reviews. Not bad for a town of 380,000 people ... Melbourne had four times as many restaurants listed, but with only 24,000 reviews to spread amongst that lot. Trattoria Fantoni where I ate rates 3 out of 5, but comes in 382nd on the list - skewered by a couple of unfavourable reviews, including one from Lois in Melbourne! - but overall not a bad score. Similarly a place garnering 4.5 out of 5 can list as low as 60th; so we obviously bat deep here in culinary-rich Bologna, but that is not much help to the owner who is clearly doing a great job.

One other quirk to mention from this website - extraordinary when you think of Bologna's gourmand reputation - is that 10 of the top 14 'restaurants' listed were gelaterias! Now, either Bologna is slipping as a foodie destination; tripadvisor bloggers have sweet tooths; or the owners of these gelaterias have worked out how the game is played, and a lot of friends have been enlisted to post some strong reviews. Because the strength of this website is also its' achilles heel - anyone can post a review ...

TREATS

Speaking of gelati, it would be remiss not to mention our favourite place here in Bologna, which is one of the 10 gelaterias hogging the limelight over on tripadvisor. Cremeria Funivia is not the cheapest, and they certainly don't lay on the biggest serves, but boy-oh-boy is it ever creamy and tasty! The kids usually settle for fragola (strawberry) and crema or stracciatella (vanilla and chocolate), whilst pistacchio is a staple for me, and Lisa likes to mix it up with more exotic tastes like Alice (marscapone with chocolate fusion). www.cremeriafunivia.com

lost the photos of our No.1 so No.2 will have to suffice. Still pretty darn good!

lost the photos of our No.1 so No.2 will have to suffice. Still pretty darn good!

In true Italian fashion gelati can be eaten anytime after lunch, and we tend to indulge in this treat late afternoon, when flagging children need a lift, or browbeaten parents require some support and sustenance.

Gabi gets a boost in downtown Parma

Gabi gets a boost in downtown Parma

TIFOSI

This is the Italian word to describe a group of sports fans, and it usually used in reference to football supporters. The origin of the word relates back to typhoid, so you probably get the gist ...

Bologna Football Club (aka the RossoBlu from their strip) is over 100 years old, but has a recent history of struggling to avoid relegation from the top league here - the Serie A. Trophies are few and far between, so it was with not much expectation that myself and an American guy I have met (Lou) adopted the team for this year. Home games are every second Sunday, and we buy the cheapest tickets and sit amongst the rowdiest supporters. You need to show ID when buying the tickets (a few days out from a game) - cost 18 euro - and also show the ID when you enter the stadium. Stadio Renato Dell'Ara is a nice ground just out of the centro, holding 38,000, but unfortunately not covered for the rain and snow!

BFC stadium from just up the hill on a non-game day

BFC stadium from just up the hill on a non-game day

Lou from Vermont, doing his best to impersonate Luigi from Bologna

Lou from Vermont, doing his best to impersonate Luigi from Bologna

We've seen a frustrating draw (Pescara) and a bollocking (Inter Milan) at home, and I also ventured over to Firenze to see a 1-0 defeat at the hands of Fiorentina. Early days yet, but a move down to Serie B is on the cards from what us 'experts' have seen to date. Might have to adopt Lou's NFL team - the high flying New England Patriots.

disappointing 1-1 scoreline from a game we dominated against lowly Pescara

disappointing 1-1 scoreline from a game we dominated against lowly Pescara

... and the fans predictably vented their displeasure (flares are as bad it gets to date)

... and the fans predictably vented their displeasure (flares are as bad it gets to date)

A final word on the game itself. Highly skilled with the ball on the ground most of the time; more physical than I would have guessed; and crowd atmosphere terrific with great singing and chanting, and a seeming absence of malice between the opposing groups of tifosi. The only predictable, and unwelcome constant, is the diving and feigning by too many of the players.

Posted by happellfamily12 16:30 Archived in Italy Tagged restaurants school tripadvisor Comments (0)

Celebrity Blog - Joff & Wendy

Honeymoon II ... Big Game in Africa, Ever Romantic Venice, and then a sample of La Rossa

sunny 28 °C

Walking back with Dan to casa Happell from Bologna train station, first impression? Hot. Quite big, bit dusty. Probably exacerbated coming from all that aqua in Venice. Thankfully a gin and tonica wasn't far away, nor a cooling breeze atop one of the Happell's due terrazzi. A welcome retreat.

First in the schedule of events? A gymnastics display. Naturally. Gabriela and Natalie dazzled us from our mattress-side seats with a series of remarkable feats, including somersaults and eventually a backflip. Bravo! Could this be why their parents moved to Europe? Access to the best coaches and 'technology'? Rio in 4 years should reveal all. Delicioso Italian-style roast chicken topped off a wonderful welcome to Bologna.

Natalia Happellova

Natalia Happellova

"molto buona" chef!

"molto buona" chef!

Day two we slipped on our tourist shoes ... time for a serious sample of the Bolognese lifestyle. And what better way to get our bearings than from Bologna's highest point. 400+ steps later we'd climbed Torre degli Asinella - the tallest of the famed Due Torri (Two Towers). Apparently a tower was the height of fashion (ed : nice one Joffa) a few centuries ago. If you wanted to impress your neighbours, a ridiculously high tower was the go. There used to be nearly 200 watching over the town, but now only a handful remain.

Wendy wouldn't blow out a candle ... not sure about the Happells but ...

Wendy wouldn't blow out a candle ... not sure about the Happells but ...

While Dan and Gabi slipped home for some schooling, Wendy and I enjoyed a stroll around town, including Neptune's spectacular fountain - just off the main piazza in town (Piazza Maggiore). And onto the quieter, atmospheric streets of the old town where the fish, meat, vegetables, and delis made a mouthwatering sight. After meeting Lisa fresh from Italian class it was lunchtime. More tasty, fresh, simple food expertly ordered by our 'local' hosts.

Il Quadrilatero - start point for any delicious home cooked meal

Il Quadrilatero - start point for any delicious home cooked meal

We spent the evening with another Aussie-in-Bologna, Mitch Dowd and family. Great to catch-up and hear them wax lyrical about their Italian adventures so far.

Dan, Jayne, Lisa, and Mitch

Dan, Jayne, Lisa, and Mitch

some good looking boys at the party Nat ... stop playing on the ipad!

some good looking boys at the party Nat ... stop playing on the ipad!

Yours truly, Mitch, and his boys Ewan and Hunter

Yours truly, Mitch, and his boys Ewan and Hunter

Next day, Dan suggested a trip to Parma, home of the famous cheese and prosciutto. Like so many interesting places, just a short train-ride from Bologna. Gabi (Nat was making her daycare debut) led the way to a delicious lunch before we found the sights, including an impressive cathedral, baptistry, attractive piazzas, and impressive gardens.

well satisfied gourmands after a lovely lunch at Ristorante La Forchetta

well satisfied gourmands after a lovely lunch at Ristorante La Forchetta

some mirth alongside Piazza Garibaldi

some mirth alongside Piazza Garibaldi

Giardino Ducale - Wendy and Gabi had a great time here in the open spaces

Giardino Ducale - Wendy and Gabi had a great time here in the open spaces

Our farewell dinner was at a local trattoria Dan and Lisa were keen to try. And what a feast! Spectacular seafood including a dish I 'couldn't possibly finish' but somehow managed to (ed : still got it Jonnie!). No wonder the waiter declared us the 'No.1 table' for the evening. For which the award seemed to be the run of the Meloncello bottle - a delicious canteloupe flavoured liquer. Found room for that too. By the time we left the restaurant, our Italian heatwave had broken. The rain was tumbling down. Not that we noticed ... Bologna's famed porticoed streets came into their own and we navigated a passage home, with barely a drop.

mmm ... still room for tiramisu non?

mmm ... still room for tiramisu non?

any more Meloncello and a map would have been required for the homeward navigation

any more Meloncello and a map would have been required for the homeward navigation

Sadly, the next morning it was time to leave. A final caffe at Dan's local then the challenge of driving to Lucca awaited. Nothing compared to the challenge of selling your house and moving to another country. Our hosts have already seen and done so much, it was a privilege to be part of their adventure. And it's really only begun.

the only way to start the day ...

the only way to start the day ...


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Posted by happellfamily12 15:53 Archived in Italy Tagged bologna friends sites tourist guests parma Comments (2)

One of the world's great (slow) runs?

SANTUARIO DELLA BEATA VERGINE DI SAN LUCA

all seasons in one day 18 °C

Leave your sunscreen, gumboots, and snow shoes behind; they are redundant on this amazing run that can be almost entirely completed under Bologna's historic porticoes.

yep, that spec in the distance is our target

yep, that spec in the distance is our target

Since arriving in Bologna in late August, Lisa has devoted herself to improving her parli Italiano, whilst my two passions have been following the Bologna FC - aka the RossoBlu - and trying to see as much of the town as possible on foot (and now also on bike following a recent purchase). The Santuario can be seen from our rooftop garden, so it became an obvious early target for a regular fun run.

looks pretty simple on paper - just follow the arrows! centro storico is marked by the (sort of) square shape; porticoe starts when you leave the centro

looks pretty simple on paper - just follow the arrows! centro storico is marked by the (sort of) square shape; porticoe starts when you leave the centro

Via Guglielmo Marconi - start point just near our apartment; pedestrian dodging commences here

Via Guglielmo Marconi - start point just near our apartment; pedestrian dodging commences here

Constructed in 1723, the Sanctuary can be reached by walking or running along and up the world's longest covered walkway, the Portico di San Luca, which is 3.5 kms long and consists of 666 arches. The portico was built to protect a miraculous icon of the virgin as it was paraded up the hill. Nowadays it is used by fitness conscious locals and dog walkers during the day, and couples for their fare una passeggiata (pre-dinner stroll) in the evening. There is an annual procession from the Cathedral of San Pietro in the centre of town up to the Sanctuary along this path.

Via Nosadella - 10 mins in and surrounds become quieter; covered walkway runs down the right hand side

Via Nosadella - 10 mins in and surrounds become quieter; covered walkway runs down the right hand side

Porta Saragozza - you reach this landmark after 15 mins - the world's longest arcade starts on the other side

Porta Saragozza - you reach this landmark after 15 mins - the world's longest arcade starts on the other side

Via Saragozza - don't worry about counting sheep, count the arches! this is the last of the flat stretch

Via Saragozza - don't worry about counting sheep, count the arches! this is the last of the flat stretch

From our apartment the first part of the run is flat, and requires nimble footwork to dodge cars, bikes, and pedestrians. After about 15 mins you reach the start of the Portico, and 10 minutes after that you begin the climb! A resilient shuffle will then get you to the top in another 20 minutes, where you can catch your breath, seek 1st aid (divine?) assistance, and take in the splendid views.

starting the climb; funny how it doesn't look as steep on film ...

starting the climb; funny how it doesn't look as steep on film ...

half way up the hill (Monte Della Guardia)

half way up the hill (Monte Della Guardia)

finally there ... always a great feeling!

finally there ... always a great feeling!

Returning back down is twice as quick, but can take a toll on various joints with the hard jarring encountered. A steady plod home from the bottom of the Monte will see you stop the clock at just over an hour, and aperitivi will then beckon on the rooftop as you contemplate another assault in the coming days!

looking south west ... tranquility

looking south west ... tranquility

not too many high-rises in downtown Bologna

not too many high-rises in downtown Bologna

the irony is hard to ignore - you pass Via Pietro Coubertin on the way back - considered to be the father of the modern Olympics - inspiration anyone?

the irony is hard to ignore - you pass Via Pietro Coubertin on the way back - considered to be the father of the modern Olympics - inspiration anyone?

Posted by happellfamily12 15:15 Archived in Italy Tagged church bologna running Comments (0)

Planes, Trains, Automobiles, Bikes, Taxis, Ferries, Buses

It is hard to believe that it is four months since we left Australia armed with our four bags.

those bags

those bags

Since that time we have covered much ground and seen many places :

Planes - Singas, Milano, Morocco, Copenhagen, Stockholm, Ancona, Berlin, Pisa.

nice_and_cosy.jpg

Trains - 25 and still counting.

Ferries - Just a few

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Lost - one European adaptor and a few tempers over : trains, technology, crap directions, dumb tourists ... not excluding ourselves from this category, forking out for unexpected taxis, paying twice for the train tickets in Switzerland - thanks Trenitalia, Italian bureaucracy.

Thank-you - Tak (Danish, Swedish), Grazie (Italiano), Merci (Swiss French, Morocco), Danke (German).

Loved - Italian prices (2 euro beers and massive gelati, and also many meals for under 8 euro). Northern European efficiency and the Christiana.

Cheap Beer and Food

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cheapprices.jpg

pasta

pasta

Love that bike

Love_that_Bike.jpg

Highlights - Lake Como, Le Marche, Berlin, Lucca, Gotland, Bike Riding, Rock Jumping - Otranto, staying at the airport hotel and having dinner in the airport (Milano). Watching Olympics and listening to commentators in Danish, Italian and Swedish.  Molto Gelati - Flagola for Nat (her Italian for strawberry), stracciatella for Gabi. Lake Garda and lunch in Malcesine (tortellini with smoked cheese and pistachio nuts).

Food, Jumping and Gelati

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Airport_Dinner.jpg

A lovely lunch in Porto Venere

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Its the wind not the gelati

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Lake Garda and Le Marche

San_Severino_Marche.jpg

Lake_Garda.jpg

Walked - many, many kilometers over cobblestoned paths.

Climbed - thousands of stairs - why is it so that our apartments are always on the top floor? Dan??

Lugged - 80, 60, 40 kilos of luggage, 20/23 kilo children

Discarded - 20, 40 kilos of luggage, no children

offloading.jpg

Taken - many photos, a bit of free lunch from the breakfast buffets (gotta stick to the budget).

Swum in - the Adriatic, Mediterranean, Atlantic, Baltic (bit crisp), Lake Como, Lake Geneva. Piscinas : Menaggio, Lausanne, Berlin, Le Marche, Lake Garda, Mazagan.

Atlantic and Lake Como Pool

Lake Como Pool

Lake Como Pool

Atlantic

Atlantic

Sunset & Sunrise - in Morocco 8.30pm and Stockholm 4.20 am

Sunrise from the hotel room

Sunrise.jpg

sunset.jpg

Read - Bring Up The Bodies - Hilary Mantel; The Killer's Art, Unspoken - Mari Jungstedt; The Dark Heart of Italy - Tobias Jones; A Month Of Sundays - John Updike; An Italian Education - Tim Parkes; a few lowbrow novels.

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Slept in - 19 beds

Packed and unpacked - 20+ times

School - Gabi has attended school in all the countries visited even if it is via distance Ed.

School Work Le Marche

School Work Le Marche

Who knows what the next eight months will bring ...?

Posted by happellfamily12 14:11 Comments (0)

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